Family Lines

stories for you

Tag: Calgary Chamber of Commerce

Media meltdown

Old Herald desk.

Drawer full of reporter graffiti. Names and doodles from an antique Herald desk drawer on display at the City of Calgary Corporate Records, Archives.

The newspaper industry across Canada was dealt a massive blow last week. It hit me personally as my husband was caught in the layoff tsunami. We need more trained journalists, not fewer.

I know there are other sectors hurting and the economy in Alberta is weak right now. At a Calgary Chamber of Commerce event a couple of weeks ago, I talked with a member about how she’s dealing with the tough economic climate. She said there have always been booms and busts and it’s part of the cycle. She’s been through it before and said she will weather this storm too.

I’ve been through it as well and was laid off from my newspaper job in 2009. I’m not employed as a journalist today. It’s a sad time for all media across North America and many don’t seem to see the worth in news anymore. I read the comments section of the CBC Calgary story on Postmedia’s move to combine and gut the Calgary Herald and Calgary Sun newsrooms (as well as similar mergers in Edmonton, Vancouver and Ottawa) and it made me sick to see what people were saying about papers. That news should be free and journalists only write what Big Business tells them to write. Conspiracy theories from commenters who don’t value the job of reporters.

Walking amongst the tall buildings and business workers in downtown Calgary on Friday, I overheard a woman telling another woman, “Change is good. Remember that.”

Change can be good and in fact, journalists live for change. It’s one reason why we get into the news business. But change can also leave spaces, voids, gaps in information. These holes deprive us of stories, stories that explain what’s happening in our city or country or world. Stories that unite us with other people and connect us to our neighbours.

Bloggers might be able to fill some of the cracks, but they’re not trained to follow and uphold time-honoured journalistic standards of accuracy and fairness. To separate fact from opinion. Being a journalist is not just an occupation: it’s a profession; it’s a calling. The newspaper landscape of Calgary has been indelibly changed and not for the better. As journalists disappear from newsrooms, so does the record of our city’s history, our stories.

Corporate histories: stories worth telling

Family_Lines_chamber_blogThis past week I was a guest blogger for the Calgary Chamber of Commerce. I wrote about company histories being stories worth telling. The post was sent out in the June 30th issue of eConnecting, the chamber’s digital newsletter. Unfortunately, the link under my introduction doesn’t work so I’ve posted the piece below.

Corporate histories: investing in your future

Businesses look to the future. Why? Because the future is what companies, big or small, invest time, money and other resources in. The future is where the payoffs come and rewards are

reaped. We’re fixated on what’s ahead and we forget to look behind us. However, our company pasts are just as important to our future successes. Corporate histories give us an understanding of the past and they’re a powerful tool for the future in both business and relationships.

Stories are the means to tell people – prospective clients, customers and shareholders – about a company’s culture: how it was created and built and what is expected. It’s a history to be proud of as well as a powerful communication tool. The Calgary Stampede is a great example of an organization successfully blending the past and today. The Greatest Outdoor Show on Earth has been part of our city for over one hundred years: a legacy thanks to Guy Weadick and the “Big Four.” The anecdote of how they got the Stampede up and racing more than a century ago is told over and over again. It’s part of Calgary’s history, our story, and draws thousands of Albertans and tourists to our city.

Soft forms of capital

Besides increasing business, corporate stories are also an investment in your future when you factor in soft forms of capital such as reputation, trust, goodwill, image and relationships. Tell a strong company narrative that includes being open, honest and transparent along with demonstrating a good financial performance, reliable products and services. Randy McCord, business director and founding member of the National Best Financial Network, said an authentic story speaks volumes about, and for, a company.

“It lets employees and the community read between the lines. It’s not all about business: it’s also about successes, challenges, problems and most of all — people. These make for compelling stories.”

Compelling stories

Interesting stories aren’t only about achievements but obstacles too. Don’t ignore valuable lessons learned from big and small mistakes that helped your company get to where it is today. This kind of narrative thread also gives people insight into your business culture and leadership over the years, as well as how the company has persevered.

Anniversaries and milestones are celebrated because of the hard work you and your staff do to reach landmark occasions. Sharing everyone’s story, from management to the shop floor, helps strengthen your brand as well as deepen employees’ beliefs and trust in their roles within the company. Bottom line: it makes people feel good and they’ll tell others. Besides company/employee benefits, a corporate history also breathes new life into old product lines, reinforces corporate culture and enhances recruiting efforts.

Corporate narratives can be a strategy for onboarding as well as a strategy in the succession planning process. Use the experiences of your past and present staff to fill in the blanks for new hires. Instead of only using directives and manuals, pass on company knowledge, skills and insight by way of a documented story from executives and other employees.

Social media

Now that you have a company history, don’t let it sit on a dusty shelf: put it to work. Expand and engage your audience by connecting through different social media platforms. Tweet out old photos of your company’s first office. Compare it to where you are now. Post a quote on Facebook from a founding member and ask people if the saying still rings true. Use excerpts of your story as blog posts or in advertising.

Your business is a rich source of material that’s probably not being used to its full potential. Corporate histories are unique stories that also illustrate leadership, business strategies and dovetail with marketing and social media campaigns. Experience counts in the corporate world and should be shared. What will you share?

 

 

© 2017 Family Lines

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑