Family Lines

stories for you

Tag: Family Lines (page 8 of 17)

Manwich mistake

Sloppy Joes.

Sloppy joe / Manwich = Yuck

There’s a memory going around and around in my head. Waiting to get out…or spill out. The story is about a sloppy joe.

I was little, maybe about six years old, when I was invited to my friend’s birthday party. Her name was Suzie and she lived across the street in a white house a few homes over. She was a couple of years younger than me and I remember her in a pink dress.

I bet I was excited for the party. In that way when you’re a kid and you can eat all the goodies you want and not worry about getting a muffin top. (Though I doubt muffin top was even a word used in the mid-70s in Nova Scotia to describe wobbly stomach bits hanging over your jeans.)

My two sisters and I headed to the festivities. There were friends and games and it was lots of fun. Suzie’s mother walked around to each kid asking how many sandwiches we wanted. When it was my turn I said, “Two, please.”

Two because I didn’t know if Suzie’s mother would know I meant a whole sandwich. If I said I wanted one sandwich, she might think I just wanted half a sandwich. I wanted the whole thing. The two parts of the one sandwich.

I guess the kind of sandwich didn’t matter to me. My prospective party meal wasn’t going to be gluten-free or multi-grain or sugar-free anyway. Back then, a sandwich would have a fifty-fifty chance of being peanut butter or peanut butter and jam. On white bread.

I was sitting in an armchair when Suzie’s mother brought me my sandwich…that wasn’t. I had no idea what it was. In front of me were two buns oozing ground beef. What I didn’t know then – but I know now – is that Suzie’s mother had said “Manwich,” which is a brand name for sloppy joes.

The sloppy joes/Manwiches/whatever did not look good to me. They didn’t taste good either. And there were two of them.

My parents raised me with manners. When you are visiting someone, you eat what they give you. You eat everything they put on your plate. You leave nothing.

Whether I took big bites and gobbled it down quickly or took my time sliding the sloppy joe down my throat, I don’t know. I only know that those two Manwiches were the first two and last two of my life.

Common people

Family_Lines_peopleThere’s a theory that we’re connected to every single person in the world through six degrees of separation. That is, we all have someone in common everywhere and anywhere we go: a friend of a friend of friend of a friend… It’s a small world after all as I rediscovered during a recent trip to see a client in Burlington, Ont.

My client has a German background and we’ve been working on her stories about living in Hamburg and growing up during the Second World War. She came to Canada with her husband for work years later and her three children were born and raised in Burlington. I met my client through her daughter, who is a good friend of mine. We met in Vernon, B.C.

I went to Ontario two weeks ago to finish my client’s story. We were looking for photos to add to her memoirs and I was flipping through the pages of an old album when a picture caught my eye. I thought I recognised the people in it: a friend and her family. It was them.

I’m from Nova Scotia and met my friend playing floor hockey in Grade Six. We were opponents and my friend high-sticked me in the mouth. And I had braces. There was some blood shed on the Port Williams Elementary School gym floor and despite this, we became friends and stayed friends. I visited her in Montreal and Germany and went to her wedding in the States. She came to my wedding a few years ago. So what ties me, my friend and my client together?

Burlington, Ontario.

Burlington, Ontario.

Burlington. It’s the common denominator. My friend is of German background and when her parents lived in Burlington, they made friends with my client. When I went to Burlington, I saw the photos. It was a random discovery but a cool one. It certainly made the world feel a lot smaller.

Do you have a six degrees of separation story? Tell me about it.

Storrytime in Ontario

Airplane wing.One of my memoir client’s lives in Ontario and I’m going to visit her this week. We’re working on finishing her two books. She has lots of interesting and fascinating stories, photos and documents and I can’t wait to put the books together and publish them for her family.

See you when I return.

Winter in summer

Peter Lougheed Provincial Park - Kananaskis Country.

Aug. 22, 2015. Chester Lake trail – Peter Lougheed Provincial Park – Kananaskis Country.

It’s still August but that doesn’t mean it won’t snow in Alberta. Here’s proof that the dog days of summer in the mountains can be white and cold. At least the sun is shining and the lake hasn’t frozen over…yet.

Whatever the weather, it’s not time to reminisce about another season passing. It’s not time to move on to making autumn memories. No. The calendar says summer and darn it, I’m going to enjoy every last drop of it. Even if those drops come in a frozen form usually found in winter. Summer snow makes a cool story anyway for those of you sweltering in the heat.

Political write

Photo of Graham Clews.

Author Graham Clews

Let me introduce you to Graham Clews. Graham is addicted to books — writing them, that is. The Westlock, AB author has seven novels to his name, covering many different subjects and genres. From historical fiction to stories for young adults to political humour, the characters keep forming and jumping from his mind to the page. Now he’s looking to get his books into the hands of readers. That’s where I come in.

I’ve been helping Graham with the marketing of his books. He has taken a year off from writing (if he can help it) to promote his novels. His first book signing will be on Sunday for his latest title, Politically Detained. With the country in the middle of a federal election campaign, the book couldn’t have hit shelves at a better time.

For most of us, we tune in and out of federal politics. It can be dry, boring and many people feel any election result won’t bring about much change anyway. The ennui goes beyond Harper versus Trudeau versus Mulcair versus May. It doesn’t really seem to matter who is at the helm of the government, there’s no way to make a difference. Or is there? That’s the serious question Graham explores with a deft comic touch in Politically Detained:

Across Canada people gripe about politicians, but never do anything about it. There’s a reason: they can’t. So why try? After all, how do you form a special interest group when you’re in the majority? How do you get the message to the elected if it costs votes? How do you fight apathy when so many people are too busy to care?

Photo of book cover.

Politically Detained: a book about change

The answer…you’ve gotta have a cause; you’ve gotta have a plan; and you’ve gotta have the right people. A disgruntled Minister of Finance, determined to step down in a reckless burst of glory; a half dozen well-heeled seniors with influence who are not afraid to use it; a reluctant Member of Parliament, accidentally caught up in their web of intrigue; three spectacularly unfair federal policies that cost billions; a novel plan to reform the federal electoral system and, what the heck, the senate too. It’s a good place to start….

If you’re interested in what’s happening in Canadian politics right now, then Politically Detained: A novel about change is a book you’ll want to read. You’ll also be able to meet the author if you live in the Edmonton area. Graham is signing books at Chapters Strathcona, 10504-82 Ave., this Sunday, Aug. 23 from 1 to 5 p.m. Political leanings of all stripes welcome.

For more info on Graham and Politically Detained, go to: http://www.graham-clews.com.

He’s also on Twitter, GoodReads, Facebook and has a blog. Now go read a book!

Giving back

detail-pen-photography-Favim.com-5198291Capital Ideas Calgary asked businesses: “How does your business give back to the community?”

Here’s my answer published in the Calgary Herald on July 23, 2015: http://bit.ly/1MaJcig

How does your business give back to the community?

Everyone has a story but not everyone has the chance to share his or her stories. This especially true of people living on the streets or dealing with addictions. As the owner of a writing business, I’ve been giving back to the community by teaching memoir writing workshops at homeless shelters and detox centres.

I’ve been volunteering through a Calgary organization called This is My City (TMC) for a few years. TMC brings art and people together no matter what their social status. In my workshop, Write YOUR Story, participants learn to tell their tales in their own words. They can write happy stories or sad stories or scary stories or inspirational stories. Positive or negative, these anecdotes give a voice to people whose words might never be heard.

Have a very scary holiday

Family_Lines_Leapbks_frightheader1Looking for some Christmas fear? Yes, it’s still July and many of us aren’t thinking about Christmas but I have announcement. One of my fiction stories was picked up and is being published in the Fright Before Christmas anthology. I’m being paid for it too. Always a happy event for an author.

FRIGHT is a collection of 13 tales, from 13 different authors and will knock the stockings off your fireplace this Christmas season. Earlier this April, I read that the publisher, Leap Books, was looking for submissions for the anthology. That’s when I scraped together an idea and wrote about a stenchy monster that takes instead of gives on December 24.

Many of you probably think of Christmas as a time of good cheer and tinsel and hohoho. But my festive memories always have a bit of a scary side. That’s because my father used to bring home horror movies to watch as a family over the holidays.

This was pre-VHS machines and definitely before watching movies online. He rented out a large LaserDisc player and then stocked up on creepy films. I saw such Christmas gems as Alien, Aliens and Invasion of the Body Snatchers. The Body Snatcher scene where the dog has a human head and his owner has his dog head really made an impact on me. I couldn’t sleep alone for weeks and would drag a blanket into one of my (younger) sisters’ rooms and curl up on the floor for the night.

It this kind of Christmas magic that I’m familiar with so I don’t have any problem writing a scary story for a happy holiday. FRIGHT is set to launch in November of this year and is for children in Grade 6 to 9. My other kids’ book is already out. The Raven named Flight and How She Learned to Fly is about a raven from Fort Smith, NWT. I wrote the story and had the illustrations done by Helen Monwuba. I published the book myself this past December 2014.

kids; book about a raven.

The Raven named Flight and How She Learned to Fly

Print book

Blurb: http://blur.by/1zZpZdi / $32.99 CAD without shipping

Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1320278310 / $28.58 US without shipping

Ebooks:

Blurb: http://store.blurb.ca/ebooks/p43a9f931da2cda4398e5 / $4.99 CAD

Apple iBookstore: http://itunes.apple.com/ca/book/id950045042

Take a funky interlude

Sea King.

A Canadian CH-124 Sea King performs deck landing. qualifications on board dock landing ship USS Pearl Harbor (LSD 52) during PANAMAX 2007. PANAMAX 2007 is a joint and multinational training exercise tailored to the defense of the Panama Canal, involving civil and military forces from the region. U.S. Navy photo by Lt. j.g. Brett Dawson (RELEASED)

If you lived in the Maritimes in the 90s, you might remember TV interludes. Every now and then a video put to music popped up on the screen instead of a commercial. Why there were interludes, I’m not sure, but it was a nice break from ads.

ATV (CTV in the Maritimes) broadcast the interludes and I have often wondered if the musical breaks were just a Maritime thing. Or if across the country, we were all glued to the 90s version of Vine. Whatever the reason, take a funky little respite with these three interludes.

Sea King over Halifax interlude

ATV downhill skiing interlude

Christmas interlude

Who are you?

Painting of a soldier.

Do you know who this soldier is?

A few summers ago I bought a painting at a yard sale in Vernon, B.C. It’s acrylic on velvet; almost like one of those velvet Elvis pictures you see hanging in someone’s creepy wood-panelled basement. Except it’s not Elvis staring back at me, it’s a soldier. This soldier is nameless and nationless but his story may have been revealed by a click of a mouse.

The painting appealed to me: the colours, the texture of the “canvas,” the subject, and I brought the piece of art home for four dollars. The unknown soldier has travelled with me around Western Canada and now lives in Calgary. Even though we’ve been living together for about seven years, I don’t know anything about him.

One friend who met the soldier thought he was a Gurkha, a fearsome soldier from Nepal. Their famous motto is, “Better to die than be a coward.” Gurkhas still carry their traditional weapon called a kukri, an 18-inch long curved knife. An interesting speculation but I don’t think this guy one of these warriors.

The other day I was wasting time online when I clicked on a BBC News link: Why the Indian soldiers of WW1 were forgotten. The article’s main photo was in black and white but I immediately recognized the uniforms: my soldier’s kit. Was he an Indian solider in the First World War?

I don’t know. But through the article by I learned that the feats and the losses and the stories of these soldiers are missing from most of our history books. Some people, including me, have no idea of the contribution of the Indian units. It also makes me think about the time when I lived in The Gambia, West Africa. My roommate and I walked past the Fajara War Cemetery a couple of times and I wondered why we don’t hear about Gambian veterans. Where are their stories?

There’s no signature on my soldier’s likeness. No markings to tell me where he is from or where he belongs. Nothing to identify him. However, his silence spoke to me and opened a new portal into the past and introduced me to some forgotten sacrifices.

Corporate histories: stories worth telling

Family_Lines_chamber_blogThis past week I was a guest blogger for the Calgary Chamber of Commerce. I wrote about company histories being stories worth telling. The post was sent out in the June 30th issue of eConnecting, the chamber’s digital newsletter. Unfortunately, the link under my introduction doesn’t work so I’ve posted the piece below.

Corporate histories: investing in your future

Businesses look to the future. Why? Because the future is what companies, big or small, invest time, money and other resources in. The future is where the payoffs come and rewards are

reaped. We’re fixated on what’s ahead and we forget to look behind us. However, our company pasts are just as important to our future successes. Corporate histories give us an understanding of the past and they’re a powerful tool for the future in both business and relationships.

Stories are the means to tell people – prospective clients, customers and shareholders – about a company’s culture: how it was created and built and what is expected. It’s a history to be proud of as well as a powerful communication tool. The Calgary Stampede is a great example of an organization successfully blending the past and today. The Greatest Outdoor Show on Earth has been part of our city for over one hundred years: a legacy thanks to Guy Weadick and the “Big Four.” The anecdote of how they got the Stampede up and racing more than a century ago is told over and over again. It’s part of Calgary’s history, our story, and draws thousands of Albertans and tourists to our city.

Soft forms of capital

Besides increasing business, corporate stories are also an investment in your future when you factor in soft forms of capital such as reputation, trust, goodwill, image and relationships. Tell a strong company narrative that includes being open, honest and transparent along with demonstrating a good financial performance, reliable products and services. Randy McCord, business director and founding member of the National Best Financial Network, said an authentic story speaks volumes about, and for, a company.

“It lets employees and the community read between the lines. It’s not all about business: it’s also about successes, challenges, problems and most of all — people. These make for compelling stories.”

Compelling stories

Interesting stories aren’t only about achievements but obstacles too. Don’t ignore valuable lessons learned from big and small mistakes that helped your company get to where it is today. This kind of narrative thread also gives people insight into your business culture and leadership over the years, as well as how the company has persevered.

Anniversaries and milestones are celebrated because of the hard work you and your staff do to reach landmark occasions. Sharing everyone’s story, from management to the shop floor, helps strengthen your brand as well as deepen employees’ beliefs and trust in their roles within the company. Bottom line: it makes people feel good and they’ll tell others. Besides company/employee benefits, a corporate history also breathes new life into old product lines, reinforces corporate culture and enhances recruiting efforts.

Corporate narratives can be a strategy for onboarding as well as a strategy in the succession planning process. Use the experiences of your past and present staff to fill in the blanks for new hires. Instead of only using directives and manuals, pass on company knowledge, skills and insight by way of a documented story from executives and other employees.

Social media

Now that you have a company history, don’t let it sit on a dusty shelf: put it to work. Expand and engage your audience by connecting through different social media platforms. Tweet out old photos of your company’s first office. Compare it to where you are now. Post a quote on Facebook from a founding member and ask people if the saying still rings true. Use excerpts of your story as blog posts or in advertising.

Your business is a rich source of material that’s probably not being used to its full potential. Corporate histories are unique stories that also illustrate leadership, business strategies and dovetail with marketing and social media campaigns. Experience counts in the corporate world and should be shared. What will you share?

 

 

Older posts Newer posts

© 2017 Family Lines

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑